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     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

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projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
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projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
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projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
Zoom Info
scanzen:

projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
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scanzen:

projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
Zoom Info
scanzen:

projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
Zoom Info
scanzen:

projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
Zoom Info
scanzen:

projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
Zoom Info
scanzen:

projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.
     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.
     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!
Zoom Info

scanzen:

projecthabu:

     Welcome to historic Launch Complex 26 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, the place that launched America’s absolute first venture into space. This complex operates two launch pads, 26A and 26B. On January 31, 1958 at 10:48 PM EST, our first satellite, Explorer 1, lifted from launch pad 26A, shown in the top two photos. The launch tower and platform are now gone, but some remnants and scorch marks remain. This place really started it all. Explorer 1 proved Wernher von Braun’s capabilities as a space engineer, and set him on a road that would lead humanity all the way to the moon.

     Standing in the cramped quarters of launch control gave a real feel for how raw and real everything was in those days. There were no digital systems involved whatsoever. The blockhouse was positioned 400 feet from the launch pad, because that was the maximum distance they could transmit a clean signal along a wire to the rocket systems. Each launch controller looked at a panel of analogue instruments and gauges for every individual system. Now, there are so many systems that software has to monitor all of it. We simply don’t have the manpower to watch each aspect, as the early launch controllers did.

     This launch complex reflects a time in which every launch was truly a gamble. The opportunity for complacency wasn’t there, because of the ratio of failures to successes. Every time you launched, you really didn’t know what would happen. The blockhouse that contains launch control has 2.5’ thick steel and concrete walls and a 7’ thick roof. The windows, one set facing directly toward 26A and the other facing 26B, are each 45 pane thick safety glass. This was to protect the launch control crew against a catastrophic failure, which happened frequently in those days. Speaking with a former launch controller, he said that a failure “really made a mess of the place.” Living through all of those failures must have made victory that much sweeter when we successfully launched Explorer 1. 

holy wow!

coolchicksfromhistory:

Hypatia circa 350-415 CE
Art by Miranda Mewhort (tumblr)

"There was a woman at Alexandria named Hypatia, daughter of the philosopher Theon, who made such attainments in literature and science, as to far surpass all the philosophers of her own time. Having succeeded to the school of Plato and Plotinus, she explained the principles of philosophy to her auditors, many of whom came from a distance to receive her instructions."
-Socrates Scholasticus circa 439 CE

Hypatia was a famous Egyptian professor of mathematics, astronomy and philosophy.  She eventually became the head of the Platonist school at Alexandria.  None of Hypatia’s manuscripts survive, but she is believed to have authored an edited version of Ptolemy’s Almagest, a commentary on Diophantus’s Arithmetica, and other similar works.
In 415 CE, Alexandria was embroiled in a power struggle between the Roman Prefect Orestes and the Christian Bishop Cyril.  During this unrest, Hypatia was killed by an angry Christian mob.  Hypatia has been considered a scientific and pagan martyr killed for her beliefs.  However,  the only contemporary account of Hypatia’s murder considers it a political assassination fueled by rumors that Hypatia encouraged Orestes to remain estranged from Cyril.
Zoom Info
Camera
Samsung SGH-I747M
ISO
400
Aperture
f/2.6
Exposure
1/15th
Focal Length
3mm

coolchicksfromhistory:

Hypatia circa 350-415 CE

Art by Miranda Mewhort (tumblr)

"There was a woman at Alexandria named Hypatia, daughter of the philosopher Theon, who made such attainments in literature and science, as to far surpass all the philosophers of her own time. Having succeeded to the school of Plato and Plotinus, she explained the principles of philosophy to her auditors, many of whom came from a distance to receive her instructions."

-Socrates Scholasticus circa 439 CE

Hypatia was a famous Egyptian professor of mathematics, astronomy and philosophy.  She eventually became the head of the Platonist school at Alexandria.  None of Hypatia’s manuscripts survive, but she is believed to have authored an edited version of Ptolemy’s Almagest, a commentary on Diophantus’s Arithmetica, and other similar works.

In 415 CE, Alexandria was embroiled in a power struggle between the Roman Prefect Orestes and the Christian Bishop Cyril.  During this unrest, Hypatia was killed by an angry Christian mob.  Hypatia has been considered a scientific and pagan martyr killed for her beliefs.  However,  the only contemporary account of Hypatia’s murder considers it a political assassination fueled by rumors that Hypatia encouraged Orestes to remain estranged from Cyril.

violetimpudence:

chels:

Ben Lillie went on a tweeting spree last week about Luis Alvarez, Nobel Prize winner and all-around badass scientist. (He Storified the whole thing in a post called “In Which I Discover All The Crazy Shit Luis Alvarez Did,” so go check that out to see the conversation unfold where he discovers it all.) 

As I saw Ben’s tweets coming in, I got really interested in Alvarez and his unbelievable range of important scientific contributions. And then this morning, while I was digging through the Brookhaven archives, he popped up in a passage about the dedication ceremony for our first particle accelerator, the Cosmotron: 

"Mariette Kuper supervised the dinner arrangements, and her efforts succeeded, where others had failed, in wrecking Dean’s intention to keep the dedication ‘scientific and academic.’ She had set up several dozen tables, covered them with paper tablecloths, and in the center of each placed pitchers of her signature martinis. The pitchers had been chilled beforehand in the freezer, and on the tables they glistened temptingly with frost and tiny rivulets of dew. They looked for all the world like pitchers of water, which is how they went down…Behavior loosened, voiced grew loud, and things got boisterous…Luis Alvarez, a forty-one-year-old Berkeley physicist sixteen years away from his Nobel Prize, set his tablecloth on fire.”

Wish I coulda known this guy.

While I am deeply interested in this Alvarez character, I also want to hear more of the story about Mariette Kuper getting all the scientists sloshed.

[I can speak from personal experience that getting a scientist sloshed is often an extremely entertaining thing to do. Sorry, scientists.]

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

Do you yourself own any older home computers/terminals?

floppy-diskette:

virescent-phosphor:

I most certainly do, anon! This list has all of the computers I own on it, plus old consoles. The computer in my icon is actually a photo I took myself…I’ll just drop these here:

This is the Atari 400 in a photo I pilfered off my Tumblr from January.

More clear photo of the TRS-80.And I’ve posted just my C64 a couple of times and will do so again because the desk it’s on is a mess (as evidenced by the hanger and clothes lying on the chair and mess of paper and cables peeking over) and I’d be too embarrassed to post a photo of the setup, which is basically just an old Radio Shack color TV from the eighties, Indus GT floppy drive, and a Datasette. There’s also an iMac G4 and a couple other drives on the TV for that…like a huge old FireWire HD and a SuperDisk drive. I’ll get around to posting my desk when it isn’t a mess.

I’ve got the PowerBook and Apple IIc under the desk as well, but I can’t be bothered to get those out because it’s late out here and the IIc isn’t in great cosmetic shape anyhow.

Such a magnificent collection~

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